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Onearth Magazine: Summer 2014

We've spent billions of dollars on dikes, locks, and levees in a vain attempt to subdue what Mark Twain called 'that lawless stream.' Is it time to let the river have its way?
With its ospreys and eagles, its waving grasses and rich oyster beds, what could be more idyllic than a meandering stream in North Carolina? There’s just one problem—all that raw sewage.
How one rust belt city found the key to its rebirth: bringing nature and people closer together.
When forests burn, wild pollinators are among nature’s first responders. Ecologist Laura Burkle wants to help them do their job.
Q&A
The French graphic novelist Philippe Squarzoni presents a moral case for tackling climate change in stark black and white.
Professional race-car driver Leilani Munter refuses to slow down until she’s taken fans across the finish line—to a sustainable future.
Why, a man of the cloth wonders, do people of faith so readily exalt the symbols of creation over creation itself?
Ready for cyborgian cisterns? Sentient sewer systems? The coming smart-tech revolution promises to marry infrastructure and the Internet.
A new book evaluates whether natural gas is a 'transitional fuel' to a low-carbon future—or perhaps, more like a methadone addiction that's tearing apart rural communities.
The view from the air puts it all in perspective.
The story of how 20th-century politicians turned Native American lands into strip mines (in order to build unsustainable cities in the desert).
From Captain Cook to climate change, a new book tells the tale of how humans discovered the Great Barrier Reef—and then promptly set about destroying it.
Attorney Joel Reynolds brings the war on the environment into the courtroom (and wins). And in the fight to save the whales, he'll even take on the U.S. Navy.