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Elizabeth Royte
OnEarth contributing editor Elizabeth Royte also writes for the New York Times Book Review, which called her "no stranger to the pleasures and perils of chasing errant pieces of plastic and other castoffs to surprising (and often disgusting) places." She's the author of Bottlemania: How Water Went on Sale and Why We Bought It and Garbage Land: On the Secret Trail of Trash.
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Stories by Elizabeth Royte
October 7, 2014
INVASIVES WEEK: Ravenous and hardy, green crabs are eating up Maine’s softshell clams. How did a crustacean no wider than a credit card get an entire state fishery in its pincers?
May 13, 2014
While politicians hem and haw, artists have accepted climate change as a solemn fact—and they’re steering the cultural conversation.
April 15, 2014
Journalist Dan Fagin traverses grand canyons of chemical, medical, and epidemiological scholarship in his book 'Toms River,' which just won the Pulitzer Prize for nonfiction.
February 20, 2014
As oil trains derail across the United States, a windswept—and vulnerable—stretch of Montana’s Glacier National Park underscores the folly of transporting crude by rail.
January 30, 2014
In the wake of West Virginia's chemical spill, residents turned to bottled water. But that's even less regulated than what comes out of our tap. The real solution: let information flow.
January 13, 2014
Your kindergarten teacher was right: sharing is caring.
January 2, 2014
It’s a dirty job, but someone's doing it. And for the health of the planet, that’s a good thing.
December 5, 2013
A forward-looking building in Seattle captures rainwater in a 56,000-gallon underground cistern. And that's all the water it ever needs. How quaint, how Neolithic—and how smart.
November 21, 2013
Anaerobic digestion enlists microbes to gobble up the organic waste that typically goes into landfills. Could it also turn our rotten melons into fresh megawatts?
October 23, 2013
The country that used to take the majority of U.S. scrap now has higher standards, which is helping to improve recycling operations here at home.
September 18, 2013
You make it, you pay. Why should taxpayers foot the bill for recycling all of that wasteful plastic?
September 12, 2013
It’s hard to find a good repair shop nowadays. But when you do … well, as one couple showed, lots of people want to fix things. So why don’t we do it more often?
July 23, 2013
Screw tops and plastic corks are soaking into the wine industry, but real wood is still the better bottle stopper.
June 13, 2013
Energy independence sounds great—until you spend the night in a North Dakota Amtrak station and experience the boom’s dark side.