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Tag: Louisiana

Morning, sunshine! Open your eyes and update your brain with these #greenreads.
BP’s 'willful misconduct' caused the 2010 Gulf spill, a federal judge rules—one day after a company spokesman blamed the media for exaggerating its impact. In the bayou, it's cold comfort.
Our top picks: today's environmental news and best #greenreads.
Our top picks: today's environmental news and best #greenreads.
Our top picks: today's environmental news and best #greenreads.
Our top picks: the best environmental news and #greenreads from around the web.
Our top picks: the best environmental news and #greenreads from around the web.
Our top picks: the best environmental news and #greenreads from around the web.
Want to get Today OnEarth in your inbox? We’ve added a new signup box to the right. Just enter your email address, and every weekday morning at 11 a.m. Eastern, we’ll deliver our survey of the day’s top environmental news.... read more >
Many scientists said we'd have to wait a couple of years after the BP blowout to know the disaster's full impact. We're here. A look back at what we've learned (and haven't) and how the region is stil suffering.
How good of New York Times columnist Joe Nocera to let us know that BP has made amends and that all is well in the Gulf of Mexico. Last week the Times printed Nocera’s op-ed "BP Makes Amends," a piece of pure propaganda that... read more >
From his “place apart” on Cape Cod to America's “national sacrifice zone” in the Gulf, our writer connects the dots and -- after much soul-searching -- throws his lot in with the wind turbines.
Like any sane person, I am fond of dolphins. For the last seven years or so, since I moved south, we have been on neighborly terms. I remember my first New Year’s Day in the South, eight years ago, when I kayaked over to... read more >
This year's floods have brought more hardship along the Mississippi, but have efforts to control the river made matters worse?
The media and national spotlight quickly moved on, but what’s happened on the Gulf's shores and beneath its surface remains an unfolding story.
Almost a year later, one scientist thinks the extent of the cleanup has been exaggerated, and that much of the oil could remain.